Paleo Sandwich Bread

SANDWICH BREAD- Paleo, Resistant Starch, high-in-protein, grain-free, FAST-to-make, spongy, resilient, flexible, soft, cozy

Megan Breakfast, Hors d'oeuvres, Condiments & Sides, Treats, Whole Food Recipes 112 Comments

Here’s grain-free white bread with nutrition, bread that tastes of challah when made with honey, bread that’s great for sandwiches, or alongside soup. You’ll love how this bread rises suuuper high, ballooning itself in the oven. And you’ll need to shoo away the eager line that forms, those pesky family members who keep asking for one more slice. πŸ˜‰

Fast. You’ll also love that this bread recipe is made in 10 minutes. It is SO easy. It can be made in the blender or with a mixer and has very few ingredients. How convenient to make a loaf or two in so little time and have enough for a week or two. I like to pre-slice mine and freeze some.

If you slice it at the table during a meal, all eyes will be on you.

Paleo Sandwich Bread

The Ingredients

  1. Cassava flour– You’ve heard me say it before. If you eat this good stuff cooked and cooled then you’re giving your body resistant starch, which is great for colon health and your gut ecosystem. Cassava is the only flour in the bread and it makes the crumb pretty crumb-less. It is both strong and tender with just the right chew.
  2. Avocado oil- I like avocado oil because it’s high in monounsaturated fat and every single member of our family can eat it, despite various food intolerances. It’s also easy to measure and work with, and creates the best crumb and overall outcome in this recipe.
  3. Eggs- 10 eggs! Yes, this recipe is quite high in protein, with almost 1 egg per slice of bread! That means that a piece of bread is a meal in and of itself. But this bread does not taste egg-y. It tastes like Paleo Wonder Bread meets challah. If you want it to taste eggy, make French toast with it.
  4. Honey- If you’re sensitive even to unrefined sugars, you can sub in stevia, to taste. The point of the sweetener in this recipe is not to create a sweet loaf, per se; it just makes the bread yummy, adding to the flavor and to the texture. If you use honey, the loaf will bake up quite golden brown and taste a bit like, yes, challah. Other sweeteners will produce paler exterior and interior colors when baked, and the texture and outcome will be slightly different.
  5. Sea salt and baking soda- Yep, those are the last two ingredients, for flavor and leavening. Did you know? Baking soda does not need to react with vinegar to rise. Eggs are acidic enough to do that trick. So, basically, this is a really fast and easy recipe with very few ingredients.

Now, what’re you waiting for? If you don’t yet have Otto’s Cassava Flour, I recommend you buy it here. It’s good stuff. I can’t stop baking with it. The shipping is free; and you’ll love it.

If you’ve got the flour already, time to get baking! This loaf will be ready in one hour, start to finish; it’s that fast! Slice some while it’s warm; or remember, let it cool first if you want the resistant starch (RS) benefits!

And yes, you can re-warm the bread after it’s cooled and still get the RS! So French toast still gives your gut the happy punch. xx

Paleo Sandwich Bread

 

Sandwich Bread {Paleo}
Yum
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
12 slices 10 minutes
Passive Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 slices 10 minutes
Passive Time
45 minutes
Sandwich Bread {Paleo}
Yum
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
12 slices 10 minutes
Passive Time
45 minutes
Servings Prep Time
12 slices 10 minutes
Passive Time
45 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: slices
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. In a medium size bowl whisk together cassava, sifted baking soda and sea salt.
  3. In a high-powered blender (alternately, use a mixer) place ingredients in the following order: eggs, oil, honey, flour mixture. Blend on low speed 10 seconds. Stop motor, scrape sides and bottom briefly, and blend on low 3 more seconds. Allow batter to thicken slightly while you prepare the pan.
  4. Lightly grease a small-standard*** size loaf pan. Line with parchment paper. Pour batter in, and bake 45 minutes** in preheated oven. Test doneness with a toothpick inserted into center of loaf to be sure it's cooked through. Pull up on parchment to release loaf from pan. Cool, slice, and serve.
Recipe Notes

*A few folks in the comments have had issues with their dough spilling out during baking or being under-cooked in the center, or deflating. I tried to re-create this problem so I could help trouble-shoot. I believe this happens if the eggs are extra-large; so in essence the cook is adding an extra egg to the recipe. I use pasture-raised, local eggs that are medium or medium-large in size. I think that's the issue! πŸ™‚ So please use the same size (and preferably pasture-raised) eggs that I do to ensure success.

**This recipe has only been made using Otto's Cassava Flour. If you use a different product, you may have different results. I recommend Otto's for ensured success.

***This recipe has been made in a 4" by 8" metal loaf pan and in the small/standard size pyrex/glass loaf pan. It has also been made in a large clay (Pampered Chef) loaf pan. All of these pans baked the loaf in the exact same way: 45 minutes was the perfect amount of time needed. However, be aware that different pans may require a longer baking time.

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I’m an old-fashioned girl and love baking in Le Creuset. If you don’t have a loaf pan you love, I recommend this one- so pretty, comes in many colors, durable, and made of high-fired stoneware.


If you trust silicone and don’t have a loaf pan you love, I recommend this one. As you may know, aluminum is the metal of choice among bakers, because of how evenly and well it distributes heat. As long as you aren’t baking lemon juice or tomatoes, aluminum is safe and non-reactive. This pan is also lined with silicone and has a lifetime warranty. If you choose this pan, you will not need to line it with parchment nor grease the pan, as the recipe designates. It’s non-stick, even after 100 uses. It’s heavy duty.

Paleo Sandwich Bread

  • Renee Kohley

    Oh my! This looks amazing! I would love to try this!

  • Megan, does this taste eggy? I ask because I tried one with coconut flour which called for a dozen eggs and I didn’t like it. It was also greasy.( I am not sure how much oil that recipe called for.) I am still on the look-out for a grain free bread. πŸ™‚ Thanks! I will most likely try this one regardless, but thought I’d ask. πŸ™‚ I’ve been wanting to try the cassava flour.

  • Emily @ Recipes to Nourish

    Oh my goodness I cannot wait to make this!!! I think I have enough Otto’s left so I can make this soon. I love that it tastes like challah!

  • Megan Stevens

    Great, Renee. I hope you get to make it! πŸ™‚

  • Megan Stevens

    I think it’s worth trying. I have heard that comment from others about coconut flour recipes. I have had lots of coconut flour baked goods; and in contrast, personally, I do not think it tastes eggy. It’s just so good. I hope you love it. Cheers. P.S. Yes, there is a little of a sweet egg element, which is why I say it’s like Paleo Wonder Bread meets challah. Challah is a sweet egg bread. But I still think that “eggy” is not a good description of this bread. Hope that helps!

  • Megan Stevens

    Yay, thanks Emily. I hope you love it!! It’s quite a revelation in our home. πŸ™‚

  • Thanks Megan for taking the time to answer me. I apologize for not reading the entire article before asking. I clicked from FB and skimmed the intro and the recipe to see if I had the ingredients. When I saw the amount of eggs, it prompted my question. I should have went back and read the article because I then would have found my answer and you would not have had to repeat yourself. My apologies.

    I just ordered the cassava flour and am now eager for its arrival. Thanks again!

  • Megan Stevens

    You’re welcome and no problem. πŸ™‚

  • I am so excite to make this bread. I have to get cavassia flour.

  • Pinning this one and can’t wait to try it! Believe it or not ~ huge health food store in Toronto does not have Cassava. I did find it, as I mentioned. It’s over an hour’s drive away — so guess I need to plan a road trip! Sounds like a wonderful bread to make!

  • Alison Bergstrom Grant

    This is so cool! One of the things that gets me about baking bread is it is such a process but I like how this recipe had simple ingredients and is so quick!

  • linda spiker

    Interesting. No yeast required huh? Going to have to try this for Lindsay!

  • Yummy Inspirations

    What a genius recipe! Pinned to make for sure!

  • Tara S

    10 eggs?! Man…at $8 a dozen for pastured eggs, that’s kind of a bummer. That’s like a $10 loaf of bread.

  • Megan Stevens

    Ha, fun, wow! Well, when you’re there you may choose to buy a big quantity. I finally buy the 10 lb. bag! πŸ˜‰ Enjoy the bread!

  • Megan Stevens

    Me too! I love that I don’t have to sigh and take a deep breath before making even a second loaf because it’s all done so quickly, and magically almost! πŸ™‚

  • Megan Stevens

    No yeast. It looks and tastes like a yeasted bread; but it isn’t. The eggs and baking soda cause the good rise.

  • Megan Stevens

    Aw, thank you!

  • Megan Stevens

    Yes, it is an expensive loaf. I find eggs to be so nourishing and thus the bread so nourishing that to me it is worth it. Pastured eggs are still less expensive than other protein; and this bread is bread+; it’s protein bread. πŸ™‚

  • Sarah

    I made this in my clay bread pan which, for other recipes, hasn’t affected cook time. But this time it did. After 45 min. I removed the gorgeous loaf, but when I turned it over to help get it out, batter poured out from the top! I might have mixed it for too long – I used my kitchen aide mixer, which on low doesn’t fully blend the ingredients. (The recipe said to use low for a high speed blender so I interpreted this to mean “high” on a standup mixer. What do you think?) Also, the clay could’ve affected cook time. Either way, I covered the top with parchment to prevent further browning and put it back in for 7 more min, and then another 5. The result was a pretty, but overcooked bread – the interior color was much darker than the picture. I want to try this again – maybe using a high speed blender for 3 seconds and then 1o seconds, as well as a different loaf pan. If you have further suggestions, I would welcome them! Thanks!!

  • Sarah

    This may be a moot point but have you searched for other egg sources? Sometimes local farms who don’t participate in farmers markets or have a larger operation, will charge less. In my hometown there are farms with “fresh eggs” signs along the road. Prices range from $3 to $6 where I live.

  • Tara S

    Hi Sarah…unfortunately, I live in Northern California. It’s almost impossible to find pastured eggs around here, but I have found that the cheapest around come from the CSA that I order them from. They’re $8 a dozen through the CSA and $12 a dozen for the exact same brand at Whole Foods. Boy, I’m sure looking forward to having my own chickens!

  • Sarah

    I had a feeling you were in CA πŸ™‚ Beautiful and amazing place to live but very $$$. Good for you for planning to raise chickens! Wishing you the best with this endeavor. (I live in IN… far cry from CA!)

  • Tara S

    I’d go for a 5 acre farm in IN over my crappy townhouse in CA any DAY!

  • Sarah

    IN is a beautiful place to be!

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Sarah! I’m sorry for that bit of tragedy! Yes, my first thought is that it is indeed the pan. I have several clay baking pans and they all cook their contents more slowly. I baked mine in a traditional aluminum baking pan. I believe that both glass and metal will be reliable for this recipe. Also, I don’t know about yours, but my clay loaf pan is wider and bigger overall, so the middle takes longer to cook. I would, most importantly, use a smaller loaf pan. I think what you did with the mixer should have been fine.

  • Sarah

    Thank you Megan! Appreciate the insight. I need to invest in another loaf pan. The only other one I have has a nonstick coating. Ick. πŸ™‚

  • Megan Stevens

    You’re welcome. May you have perfect success the next go round! πŸ™‚

  • Robin Pack

    As soon as I saw this recipe, I ordered Otto’s. It came today and I’m so excited to try this! Thankfully our chickens are laying lots of eggs now that spring has arrived!

  • Shawn_Siegel

    I’m gonna try tapioca flour and see what I get…

  • disqus_8JeXOpcbg7

    Can’t wait to try this! Any idea what the carb count on this would be?

  • Megan Stevens

    Aw, yes, the chickens! I wish more folks could go this route, so abundant eggs were more accessible. Hope you love the recipe!

  • Megan Stevens

    You might end up with a very strange thing, lol. Should be a good experiment. πŸ˜‰

  • Megan Stevens

    I’m sorry. I do not know. Carbs do tend to be high, though, with cassava.

  • Megan Stevens

    Great, Anna.

  • Robin Pack

    We had this with supper tonight. Gorgeous and yummy!!! I also had some with homemade apple butter. So good!

  • Mindy Knappenberger

    I had a recipe fail. Bread did not rise, did not cook through. I have the metal bread pan you recommend in your article, used my own pastured eggs, Otto’s cassava flour, avocado oil, & honey, sea salt & baking soda, just like the recipe. I used a Vitamix blender. All ingredients were room temperature when I combined them. Thoughts? I was so disappointed:(.

  • Megan Stevens

    I’m so glad!! Yay!! Thanks for the feedback!! πŸ™‚

  • Megan Stevens

    Oh, ugh. I’m so sorry. I don’t know. 10 eggs? The eggs + the baking soda should cause the rise. I use a Blendtec; but that shouldn’t make any difference. Preheated oven to 350? Fresh baking soda? … not sure what else it could be…

  • Megan Stevens

    If you had left it in the oven longer would it have risen more and cooked through? Or did it not rise at all?

  • I am certainly PINNING THIS!

  • Megan Stevens

    Great, Gigi! πŸ™‚ Thanks!

  • Jane Janovyak

    Hmmm. This didn’t work out for me today. It did not rise at all and baked into an extremely dense, oddly textured loaf. It’s also quite damp – cooked through and holding its shape, but wet. It tastes good, and we’ll eat it (I plan to re-bake the slices for zwieback-type toasts), but it’s nowhere close to sandwich bread.

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Jane, I’m not sure what went wrong. I’m sorry for you! I’ve made the loaf so many times now and it’s always really easy and really predictable. I have had lots of readers post their loaves on Instagram and by email, too; so I know the recipe is working. I am so sorry, though, that it didn’t turn out for you. I wish I could help you troubleshoot.

  • Tam

    We use duck eggs. The yolks are so much bigger then chicken eggs. Would you still recommend using 10?

  • Jane Janovyak

    Thanks. I will try again.

  • Christine Rhodes

    That is what I was going to try….have you made it yet?

  • Shawn_Siegel

    Uh-uh – chickened out when Megan’s response made it sound like tapioca flour just ain’t the same thing as cassava flour, even though they’re both made from the cassava root. Maybe I’ll make a 1-1/2″ x 3″ loaf using the tapioca flour, as a test. 0_o

  • Megan Stevens

    You can try 9. But I can’t say for sure, because I haven’t tried it. Good luck; have fun; yum- duck eggs!

  • Katie

    What are your thoughts on storing this bread? Just pulled it out of the oven and it looks amazing! However, I planned ahead and most of it will not be eaten till later in the week. Cool and freeze? Slice first? Any tips would be awesome! I have a feeling I’ll be baking this bread again and again πŸ™‚

  • Megan Stevens

    Yes, cool, slice and freeze. Or- cool and place in fridge if you will eat it within about 5 days. I’m so glad you love it and plan to make it regularly! Yay!

  • Christine Rhodes

    So my bread looks nothing like this, I don’t know what happened, but it was undercooked on the inside and almost burned on the outside. It also came out very dark in color and kind of spongy. I don’t know what happened, I used all the same ingredients as the recipe called for. Any ideas? I really wanted this to turn out good. I used a 4×8 loaf pan.
    It looked great until I cut it.

  • Megan Stevens

    My first thought is that your oven runs hot. Do you have an oven thermometer? Either way, the honey is what darkens the loaf. I would turn your oven down quite a bit if you try again, and ideally use an oven thermometer. You want it to look on lower heat for longer, so the inside gets cooked through without the outside darkening so quickly. You can also try maple syrup in place of the honey. It’s possible that the variety of honey you used darkened more quickly than the variety I use.

  • Christine Rhodes

    Thank you for the suggestions. I will check the oven for sure. I may also try the maple syrup in place of honey. I also had a lot of lumps in my bread. I added all the ingredients together in the correct order, then mixed all at once. Was that the right way? Thanks

  • Megan Stevens

    Yes, that was the right way to do the ingredients. I have never had lumps in my batter. Do you have a high-powered blender? The batter should be smooth. Good luck with your next attempt! πŸ™‚

  • Evlyn Llanos

    hi meg. Can you briefly explain what is tapioca flour and how i can use it?

  • Dorinda

    After reading other comments I believe my oven is too hot as well. It raised on one side and spilled out on to the oven floor. I should have taken a picture it was quite interesting shape. 😁 I will turn down the tempand cook longer. Love the texture and flavor! Thank you so VERY much for sharing your wonderful recipe

  • Megan Stevens

    Wow! You’re welcome! Mine does bulge up on one side, usually, but it never spills out and over! May your next loaf be less “interesting” and more perfect. πŸ˜‰

  • Megan Stevens

    Sure, Evelyn. Tapioca comes from cassava. Cassava flour is the whole root ground up into flour. Tapioca is just the starch from the root. I prefer cassava. It has more resistant starch and less hard to digest “sugary” starch. If you want to use tapioca, it’s best used in smaller ratio, alongside other grain-free flours.

  • k9saver

    Mine came out good, more like a pound cake than bread but very good.

  • Megan Stevens

    Wow, thanks for sharing! πŸ™‚

  • Alex Luzanova

    what is the weight of one egg, that you use in this recipe?

  • Mandie

    If you search on google, there are websites that will give you the rough estimate as to how many duck eggs to use for chicken eggs. I’ve had to use that before, as I can only have duck eggs. If I remember the site I liked, I’ll post here.

  • Whisper 645

    Has anyone tried baking this bread in a pullman pan? Can the recipe be increased. Right now all I have is the large pullman pan.

  • Mazarine

    I liked this recipe a lot. That said, you must follow it exactly, do not overbeat, as Megan says! 50 secs tops. Best to mix by hand from the top of blender if you’re having a hard time getting the ingredients to combine.

    It tastes like pop-over bread. The egg flavor is very strong. If you like popovers, you will like this bread! I’ve made it twice with Otto’s flour and if your ingredients are just flour and egg, then that’s what your bread tastes like! I still call it Delicious with jam and butter! πŸ™‚

  • Dorinda

    3rd attempt is my best do far. I baked in a bain marie, lowered my oven temp to 300, half way through the bake did a 180 degree spin,added some slits to the top, baked for 38 minutes and finally had an even rise but my bread still seems more dense than the recipe. I did notice however I read the recipe wrong and added my wet ingredients to the dry. Would this make that much difference? The texture is a bit spongy but is a blessing to have bread after 4 years without! Thank you so much!

  • Dorinda

    After further inspection my bread did not cook in the very center bottom…… it was still just runny and raw…. the ends and top were cooked beautifully. So I had to turn it up side down slit the bottom with a knife and bake another 40 minutes…. All and all it just seems my oven is too hot and bakes a crust on the outside of the bread and stops it from rising.

  • Megan Stevens

    Oh my goodness, what an ordeal! πŸ˜‰ I’m sorry for you, but, like you said, happy you have bread at last. Well, there are indeed SO many variables. I’m glad you’re figuring out your oven temp. A smaller loaf pan may help you as well.

  • Dorinda

    I have considered using a muffin top pan and just make small round biscuits. A small bread pan sounds like a logical step. YES happy to have bread!

  • Debbie Arlt

    I just finished making this! And while it tastes delicious and it cooked all the way through, it didn’t rise nearly as much as yours. Mine seems about half the size. I used a 4×8 in. glass loaf pan and followed the order of the ingredients. I did use a kitchenaid stand mixer instead of a blender and so I had to mix it longer than the directions stated to get it mixed. Could that have made a difference?

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Debbie, this recipe is an ironic one. In some ways it is SO easy and works perfectly, and for some it causes issues. I wish I understood why every little variation causes variations in the outcome. Certainly the mixer could have affected the outcome. Also, I know I get the best outcomes from my aluminum baking pan, which professional bakers love, because it distributes the heat really well. I also like my stoneware one. Those links are above. But the issue may be something else. Are you using avocado oil and honey? Whatever the cause, it sounds like you need a longer baking time in the glass dish. I do think the higher rise comes from the pan material. My aluminum one is pretty small, too, and this causes the high, beautiful rise and pretty, traditional loaf shape. Even if yours doesn’t get as high, I hope you get your next loaf baked through and that you love the outcome.

  • Tina

    I’m new to this whole gluten free thing. My daughter is allergic to nuts, legumes, rice, and potatoes so I don’t want to try the avacado oil. Can I use canola? We just found this out at 19 and she’s dying for some bread.

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Tina, thanks for the great question and welcome to the gluten and grain-free world! πŸ™‚ No, unfortunately, canola is one of the least-safe oils. Avocado is less likely to cause an allergy. It is very AIP, which is a diet that does not allow ANY of the foods your daughter can’t eat. You can even find it at Costco and Trader Joe’s, so it becomes more affordable. Here’s a further introduction for you, too, if you’d like, on why canola isn’t safe and which fats are: http://drhyman.com/blog/2016/01/29/why-oil-is-bad-for-you/ xo, Megan

  • Cathy Talley

    Hello, this looks good. We have been disappointed with the store bought gluten free bread options and are hoping this comes out good! We are in a high altitude area. Are there any adjustments we should make to this recipe?

  • Megan Stevens

    I’m glad your outcome keeps improving. I can’t say for sure about the order of ingredients, because I haven’t done that. Next time you can do it the other way and see if it makes a difference. πŸ™‚ I believe my pan helps get the high rise. Aluminum is such a good conductor of heat. But there are so many subtle components; it’s hard to know. You’re welcome, by the way! I’m glad you have toast and bread at last!

  • Wendy DeGroot Conger

    Cannot WAIT to try this!!! My holistic doc put me on a pretty strict diet with no grains.
    I am intolerant to egg whites. Do you know of a good substitute??

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Cathy, I haven’t baked this loaf at high altitudes, so I don’t know.

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Wendy, this recipe will not work without egg whites. Sorry!

  • Serena Mattingly

    HI Wendy, I am also intolerant to chicken eggs, but I can have duck eggs. Try your local Craig’s listing for duck eggs, that is how I found mine.

  • Wendy DeGroot Conger

    That sounds gross. Lol!

  • Tre

    In my experience baking in glass is not optimal. Pies baked in glass pie pans stay doughy etc. I don’t think the glass convicts the heat well in baking so something Along those lines. Try a metal pan or stoneware, my personal favorite

  • Kerrie Bross

    I tried this and my bread did not rise nice – didn’t come above the the rim of the glass dish. Do you know what I did wrong?

  • Megan Stevens

    No, I don’t. Both the eggs and the baking soda make the bread rise when it is baked.

  • May Montesa Curran

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c66e09da3c6b05ca594dda361d851fc202efdc6cd781bc0d7b90a7224edf60df.jpg Thank you for this recipe! it did not taste eggy and had a nice texture and held together well.

    I read through all the comments before deciding to jump in and give it a try, knowing full well that many people were having difficulties! But I chose to go for it, making a few modifications to your recipe for what items I had available, and I’ll address what different issues people had:

    Flour
    I did not use your suggested brand cassava flour – I did use a different brand, and will try using my own homemade flour on the next go-around. (I admit that I have had repeatedly poor results trying to make bagels from the Yiddish Kitchen cookbook using Otto’s which they also recommend, so I just started buying a different brand and quit trying to make those bagels and wasting my money!)

    Temperature & Cooking Time
    I do use a thermometer in my oven, so I know it definitely was running at 350 degrees. Mine rose nicely during the baking process. At 43 minutes in the oven, I still saw a couple of bubbles pop out of the dry batter on the top of the dome, so I decided to go ahead and add 5 extra minutes.

    After a total of 50 minutes at 350, a bamboo skewer came out with some wet batter, so I lowered the temperature to 325 and let it bake for another 10 minutes. It could have used less time, maybe just 5 more min at 325 instead of 10, but I figured that I could let it go until the bread had a nice browning on it like your picture.

    Eggs
    I only had large regular off-the-shelf grocery store brand eggs. Since they were large, I used 9 instead of 10 eggs.

    Mixing
    I used a 1970’s Made in the USA hand me down hand mixer with one broken speed. The switch doesn’t even land in the detents marked Lo Med Hi and it only currently has two speeds. I don’t know which ones they were intended to be, I just consider it slow and faster speeds. I simply followed your directions in order of how to add ingredients and just mixed until the batter was smooth. I may have allowed it less than 1 minute to thicken before pouring it into the pan, but I noticed it becoming thick as my mixer was mixing, so I didn’t feel the need to wait although I really had no idea how much thicker it should have become. (My previous experiences with cassava flour was using it in a consistency as play-doh, and that recipe (Yiddish Kitchen bagels) was a repeated total failure.)

    Pan
    I just used a parchment lined non-stick 8 x 4 bread pan. I may take you up on the recommendation for a Le Creuset as I think my loaves will have a uniform rise instead of the dome my non-stick pan seems to always produce.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c66e09da3c6b05ca594dda361d851fc202efdc6cd781bc0d7b90a7224edf60df.jpg

  • Megan Stevens

    Thanks, May, for your comments! Yes, I think if someone wants no surprises 9 eggs is the way to go. I’m keeping 10 eggs as the official recipe, because it’s sublime with 10 eggs. But it does overflow for some folks with that extra egg. Thanks for sharing your photo, too! Cheers!

  • Brittney Michelle Payton

    This came out great! I only used 9 eggs and olive oil since I didn’t have avocado but it worked out. So simple and easy. I also used a hand mixer because I only have a NutriBullet and the quantities would have been pushing it. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/08654fee256a9563f80005d09b12ada03776b53a9c2a57f2c8c9665aedc62a0e.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3de102b9739ec33b8cdd2047f1d269c74bcc438a75d87dc0d17bdc8bd0d9ba4b.jpg

  • Megan Stevens

    Yay, Brittney, wonderful!! Thank you for sharing! πŸ™‚

  • Elizabeth

    This bread is delicious! We decided that it almost tastes like a pancake. And it baked up beautifully in my Pampered Chef stoneware pan. Thank you!

  • Megan Stevens

    Wonderful! Thank you for the feedback! πŸ™‚

  • Nicola Terranella

    I made this last week. I followed the recipe exactly and it turned out great. I enjoyed it but for some reason was unable to get my toddler to eat it. That is fine since bread is more of a special occasion thing. Next time we do a picnic I am thinking about making this bread for sandwiches. I also want to do French toast or a strata. I don’t really miss bread but at the same time it is nice to have options. Thanks for coming up with this and sharing. It will remain in my recipe collection.

  • Megan Stevens

    You’re welcome, and thank you for sharing your experience! πŸ™‚

  • Jo

    At what temperature is the bread done at? My regular bread is cooked at 190 degrees in my oven.
    Thanks

  • Megan Stevens

    I have not checked the internal temperature; but let us know if you determine it. πŸ™‚

  • Janice Hartmann

    Help! My loaf raised on all sides and stayed low/compact in the center! I didn’t have Avocado oil, so I used Olive oil; would that have caused this to happen? I baked it for 55 minutes and 190 degree’s, as that’s the temp for most breads. I also used Tapioca flour that we have locally, as I read its same as Cassava flour…any suggestions are welcome. Thanks!

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Janice. It’s the tapioca flour. It is not the same as cassava flour. Tapioca is just the starch extracted from the cassava root. I recommend Otto’s (http://bit.ly/1TlNT8M) cassava flour. It’s my favorite Paleo flour for so many reasons. Olive oil will also affect the finished product, but not as much. Hope you get to make it again with cassava! πŸ™‚

  • Janice Hartmann

    You’re totally right on that one! lol I did some reading after posting this,…I will be trying it again, with actual flour this time! πŸ™‚

  • Holly McLane

    Made this today here in central Oregon at 4,000 foot level or so. Definitely had to bake for 1 hour. At almost 45 mins it looked dark on top, but still low in the pan, and then all of a sudden it rose and got the beautiful crack along the top, but was clearly not baked through at 45 mins. I also used olive oil. Really delicious!

  • Megan Stevens

    Thanks for those details, Holly!! I don’t have any experience baking at higher altitudes. Glad you enjoyed it! xo!

  • Cathy Cline Lemburg

    I am trying to find a recipe for hamburger buns made with cassava flour. Do you think I could cut the recipe in half, and filll mini springform pans (I have three) about half full?

  • Sari

    this turned out great, thanks for this recipe!!!

  • Erin Krumenacker

    Actually, there are people who are severely allergic to avocados and avacado oil. If you are allergic to latex in any way, you have much higher chance of developing an avocado allergy.

  • Erin Krumenacker

    I used extra virgin olive oil and it turned out great!!

  • Lydia Deven

    Do you think I could make this into burger buns?

  • Lydia Deven

    Did you try making this recipe into burger buns?

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Lydia, you could if you have a muffin top pan. The batter is runny, so you’d need the edges to catch it and hold it in until it rises. (http://amzn.to/2wwcEzg)

  • Cathy Cline Lemburg
  • Diane Lavoie

    Love the bread, thank you so much. Can I make the bread without the honey or do I have to replace the honey with some sort of liquid?

  • Megan Stevens

    You’re welcome, so glad! Yes, you can make it without honey, but it does indeed change the outcome. It’s still pretty good, especially as toast, but not AS good. So depending on how important it is for you to not have honey, it may still be worth it to you to make the loaf. πŸ™‚

  • Megan Stevens

    Honey’s role in the bread isn’t just liquid; it also affects the texture. Nothing subs as well. Honey is the ideal ingredient, or just leave it out.

  • Diane Lavoie

    I will definitively try without honey and will let you know. Thanks again.

  • Theresa Fister

    This looks yummy. I’ve been trying to find a paleo bread recipe that doesn’t use almond flour because it always turns out heavy and dense. This looks more like regular bread. I am waiting for my Cassava flour to arrive so can’t make it until next week. I am going to try and bake it in my 9x4x4 pullman pan. Wish me luck, Thanks for the recipe.

  • Theresa Fister

    I made this today. I used my food processor to mix it which worked well. I forgot to let the batter thicken. My loaf came out dense, more like a quick bread. It didn’t rise it only filled the pan halfway. I think that is because I didn’t let it thicken before baking it. I also baked it too long. Should have taken it out at 30 minutes when I removed the pullman lid. I can’t consider it a failure because it is DELISH. Will warm and eat with butter. I will try again and use my blender instead of my food processor, let it thicken and maybe leave the lid off the pullman pan when I bake it. Thanks so much for this recipe.