How to Make the Best PARSNIP HASHBROWNS

How to Make the Best PARSNIP HASHBROWNS

Megan Breakfast, Hors d'oeuvres, Condiments & Sides, Whole Food Recipes 7 Comments

I first made parsnip hashbrowns by accident. I didn’t know that the starches in parsnips caramelize and brown better than potatoes. I left grated parsnips frying over low heat. When I came back and flipped them, my jaw dropped. Ha! I had struck gold without even looking for it.

After that mesmerizing moment and the meal that followed I tried to improve on the accident…

How, I pondered, to get all the parsnip evenly and completely golden? How not to burn parts of the parsnip hash, as it seemed apt to burn? How to get the middle cooked completely? How to make all the little pieces hold together when I flipped sections?

What seemed a great start ended up a cook’s conundrum. Perfect parsnips apparently were more elusive that accidental hashbrowns.

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I bring you this post about a year later, after trying lots of methods. I am SO excited to share with you the key points to success.

BECAUSE. Parsnip hashbrowns are the BEST. They’re sweeter than potatoes, like spiced, roasted carrots– but sweeter. But they’re also soul food, like potatoes, completely visceral and pleasure-providing. AND they’re crunchy. The exterior is a crunchy hashbrown dream; and the interior is soft, like cooked potato.

How to Make the Best PARSNIP HASHBROWNS

Step 1.

Step 1 and a key to hashbrown success is to first saute the grated parsnip in a pan. This partially cooks the veggie, so the finished  hashbrowns are cooked through to the middle without the exterior burning.

Step 2.

Step 2 includes adding flour to the parsnips, so they cling together when flipped, and for the best overall texture outcome. I’ve tried parsnip hashbrowns lots of times and lots of ways with no flour, and they’re not as good. This recipe uses the best grain-free flour: cassava. It’s healthy, yet white, starchy, and delicious. It even adds a bit of resistant starch. If you don’t yet have it in your pantry, I recommend it. It’s a staple in our house.

Step 3.

Step 3 is to bake the hashbrowns (in rounds), which ensures even browning. Frying the hash in a pan it’s very hard not to end up with some of the hash burned and some of it under-cooked.

And those… are the three keys to parsnip hashbrown success! May you enjoy, now, the sweetest, best, PALEO hashbrowns.

Parsnips

Nutritionally, parsnips provide both soluble and insoluble fiber.  Insoluble fiber helps one’s blood sugar levels, promotes healthy digestion and regulates cholesterol levels.

Excellent for grain-free diets, they’re a complex carbohydrate, providing a long-term energy yield similar to sweet potatoes. Parsnips are also high in Vitamin C, B vitamins and minerals.

Our family loves them for Sunday breakfast, alongside sausage and eggs, with coffee or hot chocolate. Ultimate brunch comfort food that’s also nourishing!

How to Make the Best Parsnip Hashbrowns

 

Parsnip Hashbrowns
Yum
Print Recipe
This recipe makes 8 hashbrown rounds. Depending on how many rounds you serve each person, the recipe feeds 4-8 people.
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 20` minutes
Cook Time
50 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 20` minutes
Cook Time
50 minutes
Parsnip Hashbrowns
Yum
Print Recipe
This recipe makes 8 hashbrown rounds. Depending on how many rounds you serve each person, the recipe feeds 4-8 people.
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 20` minutes
Cook Time
50 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 20` minutes
Cook Time
50 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Using your fingers grease 8 round circles on a cookie sheet, (where you're going to place the mounds of parsnip). Each round can be about 5 inches in diameter.
  2. Peel and grate parsnips, medium or large grate size. Melt 2 Tablespoons fat in large cast iron or stainless steel pan. Add parsnips. Saute for 10-12 minutes, until parsnips get sticky. Don't allow them to sit longer than 3-4 minutes before moving them around in pan, or they'll burn.
  3. Remove pan from heat. Stir in the cassava flour, sea salt and optional pepper, tossing to mix evenly.
  4. Using a 2-ounce cookie scoop (see link below in Recipe Notes) place heaping mounds of parsnip onto each greased circle. Allow to cool just slightly then flatten and neaten each round, so each one is about 1/2" thick.
  5. Bake in preheated oven 20-30 minutes, until bottom is browned but not burning. Place a small bit of fat (using the 2 Tablespoons remaining) on top of each hashbrown. Then, using a metal offset spatula, flip each hashbrown. Bake an additional 20-25 minutes (about) watching for underside to turn very golden brown. Serve.
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How to Make the Best PARSNIP HASHBROWNS

  • Goodness ~ These look so delicious and easy to make! I love Parsnips and am going to pin this one and make it for my family. And you know.. I finally have the Cassava flour!!!

  • Renee Kohley

    Megan!!! I LOVE this! Yum! What a fun breakfast idea!

  • Emily @ Recipes to Nourish

    I could just hug you!!! Since potatoes are out for me THIS is what I CAN have!!! Yay! I cannot wait to make this! Oh Megan, these are just beautiful. So yum! I have another bag of Otto’s on the way, can’t wait to make these soon.

  • linda spiker

    Beautiful and they are perfectly crispy! Pinned to my veggie board.

  • thefoodhunter

    I love this idea…pinning to make soon

  • Yum! I love parsnips even more than carrots and am so happy to see them back in the stores again. I’ll have to bookmark this for later. 🙂

  • Sylvie Shirazi

    Such a great idea, I need to try these!