Smashed Potatoes with Resistant Starch

Megan Health & Nutrition, Hors d'oeuvres, Condiments & Sides 40 Comments

When we were kids, folks told us that potatoes weren’t healthy. Nor was white rice. Thing is, they didn’t know about resistant starch. Course, potatoes are healthy either way- full of Vitamin C, B6, manganese, folate, iron, phosphorus, potassium, niacin and pantothenic acid, not to mention phytonutrients.

In regard to resistant starch, potatoes aren’t born with it. It’s a matter of nurture. You gotta coax it out.

If you just take a potato and eat it, sorry: no resistant starch in that tater’s nature.

Well, hold on a minute! What’s resistant starch anyway?

All right, we’ll take a step back and explain (in a normal accent): resistant starch is one variety of prebiotic food.

What are prebiotics? Prebiotics are food for probiotics.

Here’s how it goes:

  • When our good gut flora consume prebiotic foods they produce butyrate.
  • Butyrate is a short chain fatty acid that is then, in turn, consumed by T cells.
  • T cells are suuuper important in our bodies. They fight inflammation, prevent autoimmune diseases and cancer, and even fend off antigens* and pathogens.

Watch my You Tube video to learn more.

(*Antigens are substances that prompt your body to have an immune response by producing antibodies. T cells can distinguish between different kinds of antigens and prevent an autoimmune response.)

When you eat lots of prebiotic foods, like foods that contain resistant starch, you are in essence creating an army of T cells to help keep you well. Our bodies produce fewer T cells as we age; so it’s a good idea to promote their proliferation.

The form of resistant starch that potatoes have the potential to hold, must be created by first cooking them, and then cooling them. This kind of resistant starch is called RS3, or retrograded. Once cooled, RS3 containing foods can indeed be reheated.

This Smashed Potatoes recipe takes RS3 into account. We cook and cool the whole potatoes. Then we smash and bake them, making them cozy on the inside, crusty on the outside, and full of prebiotics.

This health food method is also convenient. The potatoes can be boiled ahead of time, say on a weekend or when you have time home, then popped into the fridge until you’re ready to quickly smash and bake them.

They’re a slow food version of fast food potatoes.

By the way, if you can get your hands on purple heirloom potatoes, they have the highest levels of nutrition and resistant starch, once cooked and cooled.

I give you Smashed Potatoes with Resistant Starch… to your health!

smashed-potatoes-with-resistant-starch

 

Smashed Potatoes
Yum
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 15 minutes
Passive Time
6 hours or overnight
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 15 minutes
Passive Time
6 hours or overnight
Smashed Potatoes
Yum
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 15 minutes
Passive Time
6 hours or overnight
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 15 minutes
Passive Time
6 hours or overnight
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Place potatoes in large pot. Cover with water by 1". Boil slowly until fork tender. Drain and cool potatoes. Refrigerate them overnight or for several hours.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. With the back of an offset spatula smash each potato and place into a cast iron skillet or onto cookie sheet. Drizzle generously with avocado oil and sprinkle with sea salt. (Use your fingers to rub to top of each potato with the oil.)
  3. Bake 15 minutes, then flip each potato and bake 15 additional minutes. Serve.
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By the way, you might be wondering if these potatoes are GAPS or Paleo-friendly?, since that’s generally my focus.

Yes and yes!

You’ll have plenty of people say No and no; but they are: the potatoes are GAPS-friendly for those phasing off. New potatoes are the first food recommended by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride when phasing off the diet, to challenge and see how one does, a very gentle starch.

They are Paleo because the foremost Paleo thinkers are advocates for smart carbs, smart starches, and specifically for adding in resistant starch. Many even recommend potato starch powder; but we all know that in former days when everyone was eating good, mineral rich foods no one was eating a pesticide grown (think dirty dozen) factory-made anything. Whole foods! That’s the way!