Smashed Potatoes with Resistant Starch

Megan Health & Nutrition, Hors d'oeuvres, Condiments & Sides 31 Comments

When we were kids, folks told us that potatoes weren’t healthy. Nor was white rice. Thing is, they didn’t know about resistant starch. Course, potatoes are healthy either way- full of Vitamin C, B6, manganese, folate, iron, phosphorus, potassium, niacin and pantothenic acid, not to mention phytonutrients.

In regard to resistant starch, potatoes aren’t born with it. It’s a matter of nurture. You gotta coax it out.

If you just take a potato and eat it, sorry: no resistant starch in that tater’s nature.

Well, hold on a minute! What’s resistant starch anyway?

All right, we’ll take a step back and explain (in a normal accent): resistant starch is one variety of prebiotic food.

What are prebiotics? Prebiotics are food for probiotics.

Here’s how it goes:

  • When our good gut flora consume prebiotic foods they produce butyrate.
  • Butyrate is a short chain fatty acid that is then, in turn, consumed by T cells.
  • T cells are suuuper important in our bodies. They fight inflammation, prevent autoimmune diseases and cancer, and even fend off antigens* and pathogens.

Watch my You Tube video to learn more.

(*Antigens are substances that prompt your body to have an immune response by producing antibodies. T cells can distinguish between different kinds of antigens and prevent an autoimmune response.)

When you eat lots of prebiotic foods, like foods that contain resistant starch, you are in essence creating an army of T cells to help keep you well. Our bodies produce fewer T cells as we age; so it’s a good idea to promote their proliferation.

The form of resistant starch that potatoes have the potential to hold, must be created by first cooking them, and then cooling them. This kind of resistant starch is called RS3, or retrograded. Once cooled, RS3 containing foods can indeed be reheated.

This Smashed Potatoes recipe takes RS3 into account. We cook and cool the whole potatoes. Then we smash and bake them, making them cozy on the inside, crusty on the outside, and full of prebiotics.

This health food method is also convenient. The potatoes can be boiled ahead of time, say on a weekend or when you have time home, then popped into the fridge until you’re ready to quickly smash and bake them.

They’re a slow food version of fast food potatoes.

By the way, if you can get your hands on purple heirloom potatoes, they have the highest levels of nutrition and resistant starch, once cooked and cooled.

I give you Smashed Potatoes with Resistant Starch… to your health!

smashed-potatoes-with-resistant-starch

 

Smashed Potatoes
Yum
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 15 minutes
Passive Time
6 hours or overnight
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 15 minutes
Passive Time
6 hours or overnight
Smashed Potatoes
Yum
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 15 minutes
Passive Time
6 hours or overnight
Servings Prep Time
6 servings 15 minutes
Passive Time
6 hours or overnight
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Place potatoes in large pot. Cover with water by 1". Boil slowly until fork tender. Drain and cool potatoes. Refrigerate them overnight or for several hours.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. With the back of an offset spatula smash each potato and place into a cast iron skillet or onto cookie sheet. Drizzle generously with avocado oil and sprinkle with sea salt. (Use your fingers to rub to top of each potato with the oil.)
  3. Bake 15 minutes, then flip each potato and bake 15 additional minutes. Serve.
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By the way, you might be wondering if these potatoes are GAPS or Paleo-friendly?, since that’s generally my focus.

Yes and yes!

You’ll have plenty of people say No and no; but they are: the potatoes are GAPS-friendly for those phasing off. New potatoes are the first food recommended by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride when phasing off the diet, to challenge and see how one does, a very gentle starch.

They are Paleo because the foremost Paleo thinkers are advocates for smart carbs, smart starches, and specifically for adding in resistant starch. Many even recommend potato starch powder; but we all know that in former days when everyone was eating good, mineral rich foods no one was eating a pesticide grown (think dirty dozen) factory-made anything. Whole foods! That’s the way!

  • Oooh. Now I know what I am going to do with all of those potatoes in my pantry. Can I use something other than avocado oil. I have an issue with avocado.

  • Megan Stevens

    Yes, you can use melted animal fat or extra-virgin olive oil. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Renee Kohley

    We have potato hash every Tuesday and Saturday here and I always boiled the potatoes the night before and then cube and crisp them up in a pan the next morning and I had no idea I was doing the resistant starch thing! Yeah! Very cool! I love this baking method – I might do this for dinner this week! Thank you!

  • Emily @ Recipes to Nourish

    I love this recipe! Everyone in my family loves potatoes, especially those beautiful crusty brown edges, like the ones in your photo. As you know my oldest refuses pretty much everything I make, but she loves potatoes. I think if I made them this day {instead of a Russet baked potato which is what she’s been asking for lately} she would be so happy. Plus I could get all of that healthy fat into her too.

  • This is super helpful. We were on GAPS for several years and did great bringing back red potatoes. I love the resistant starch advice!

  • linda spiker

    These look so amazing! I want to eat them right now!

  • Kristie Blankenship

    My hubby won’t eat potatoes because he is a diabetic and he says they raise his blood sugar. Would eating them like this make any difference?

  • YUM!! Sounds like the perfect side dish! Definitely going to try this ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Ike Standifird

    Would freezing the once cooked potatoe do any harm to the nutrient value?

  • CJrMom

    Question: is baking vs. boiling them ok? I cook big steamer trays of baked potatoes every week to have for dinner and leftovers. I so did not know this but have believed for years that potatoes are healthy but love to know how this method does better.

  • I told son #4 that I had to try this recipe for him and explained why. Let’s see his reaction.

  • Megan Stevens

    No, but freezing would affect the texture a bit.

  • Megan Stevens

    Baking is fine! Yes. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Megan Stevens

    Great, Tash!

  • Megan Stevens

    I don’t honestly know. My suspicion is that, no, it would not make a difference, or at least not enough of a difference for someone who is diabetic. I’ll look into it more.

  • Megan Stevens

    Yay, thanks!

  • Megan Stevens

    Great, so glad.

  • Megan Stevens

    Lovely! I hope she does enjoy them. The more fat, the better- the crispier they get. Also, I need to add this to the recipe: I found that the cast iron skillet gets the crispiest edges, as opposed to using baking trays.

  • Megan Stevens

    You’re welcome! Yes, love when that healthy stuff happens and we feel affirmed afterwards that we’ve been doing it “right” and the best way, without even knowing it.

  • Megan Stevens

    Hope he loves them! The Yukon Gold’s really get sweet. Do you grow that variety? Have you ever grown purple heirlooms?

  • Katie Stanley

    Well, what do you know? I’ve been doing it right for years! With the exception of mashed potatoes I normally cook them ahead of time and keep them in the fridge to reheat for later on. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Ike Standifird

    Thank you.

  • Wow! Makes me want to eat leftover potatoes way more often. And they are so yummy warmed up in a skillet with your favorite cooking oil or in the oven. Thanks so much for sharing this!

  • Megan Stevens

    Yay!!! Yes, we get a better texture that way, too! Crispier edges. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Megan Stevens

    Good question, Elaina. No, sadly, it doesn’t.

  • Sue

    I think I made a boo boo. My potatoes were so large that I cut them in halves or quarters. I guess I should have left them whole?? I was going to have pasta with a pasta meat sauce last night but decided to try the smashed potatoes instead since they were just coming out of the oven and smelled soooo good. It was delicious. Guess what I’m have for dinner tonight? I bought a second bag of organic potatoes because I knew this recipe would be a hit. Thanks.

  • Megan Stevens

    You’re welcome! I’m so glad you’re enjoying! Thanks for sharing your experiences! ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Evlyn Llanos

    I listened to the podcast about resistant starch..I learned so much! My question is: I grew up eating green plantains( latin food). It’s either boiled or fried, so would I get the same benefits? Thanks for all you do.

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Evlyn, I’m so glad. No, unfortunately, the benefits are lost when plantains are cooked. Sorry! ๐Ÿ™

  • Kathi Robinson

    I have a garden full of purple heirlooms this year, which aren’t quite ready to be dug up yet. And yes, I’m diabetic also, so potatoes do a number on the blood sugars. But someone mentioned purple potatoes don’t raise your BS very much so I bought some tubers and planted them just to find out. Here’s hoping I have any kind of success since I haven’t had a potato for about five years (and they are my absolute favorite food.) Can’t wait till my crop is ready for harvest now.

  • Megan Stevens

    I hope they work for you!! Purple heirlooms resistant-starch-style are the best!