Plantains are a healthy starch worth loving. Read more about the health benefit of plantains and resistant starches here. Cricket flour is a hot new insect-based flour worth loving if you're open minded, sustainably focused and enjoy the flavor of buckwheat. Read more about this grain-free flour substitute here. And now, without further delay, we'll jump right into this recipe that is made just for YOU, my AIP, egg-free, nut-free, dairy-free friends!! May you enjoy all that you can have!! This recipe is all about living it up within the boundaries that help you flourish and heal.

AIP Plantain Cricket Flour Pancakes- Egg-free, Nut-free, Dairy-free

I may receive a commission if you purchase through links in this post. I am not a doctor; please consult your practitioner before changing your supplement or healthcare regimen.

Plantains are a healthy starch worth loving. They’re gentle to digest, not for those on the GAPS diet but for those who flourish with Paleo or the AIP diets, and amazingly they are so starchy that very little flour is needed when baking with plantains. Similarly, you can make plantain recipes work without eggs. So they’re excellent for those with certain eating restrictions.

Cricket flour is a hot new insect-based flour worth loving if you’re open minded, sustainably focused and enjoy the flavor of buckwheat. Read more about this grain-free flour substitute and how to best source it. However, I have noticed that most Americans dig in their heals and refuse to eat insects. If you belong to this majority, the following recipe offers an AIP-friendly alternative. (Coconut flour can be substituted in for the cricket flour.)

And now, let’s jump right into this recipe that is made just for you, my AIP, egg-free, nut-free, dairy-free friends!!  May you enjoy all that you can have!! This recipe is all about living it up within the boundaries that help you to flourish and heal.

5 from 1 vote
Plantains are a healthy starch worth loving. Read more about the health benefit of plantains and resistant starches here. Cricket flour is a hot new insect-based flour worth loving if you're open minded, sustainably focused and enjoy the flavor of buckwheat. Read more about this grain-free flour substitute here. And now, without further delay, we'll jump right into this recipe that is made just for YOU, my AIP, egg-free, nut-free, dairy-free friends!! May you enjoy all that you can have!! This recipe is all about living it up within the boundaries that help you flourish and heal.
AIP Plantain Cricket Flour Pancakes
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 
I continue to share increasing numbers of plantain-based recipes. Take special note with each plantain recipe what ripeness of plantain is recommended. While some recipes require green unripe plantains, this recipe is just the opposite. It requires fully ripe plantains, black or almost-black all over. I use stevia that does not contain dextrose when I make this recipe. Stevia is not technically AIP. Please feel free to substitute in 1 T. local raw honey or no sweetener at all, if you prefer not to use stevia.
Servings: 2 people
Author: Megan
Ingredients
  • 2 whole plantains black!! or close to black in color, fully ripe
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil melted
  • 1/4 cup cricket flour follow the above link for sustainably-sourced cricket flour; or substitute coconut flour
  • 3 T. filtered water
  • 2 tsp. gelatin Great Lakes or Vital Proteins brands
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • optional scant NuNaturals stevia powder to taste, or use 1 T. honey, if preferred
Instructions
  1. Place the water and melted coconut oil into blender.
  2. Add the peeled plantains and all remaining ingredients.
  3. Blend on low speed until the puree is smooth, 30-50 seconds, using the pulse button or scraping down the sides as needed.
  4. Melt 1 T. coconut oil in a hot cast iron skillet and pour in the first batch of batter in rounds, turning the heat to medium-low once the batter is poured in.
  5. Allow the edges to dry out a bit and some bubbles to form, as you would with traditional pancakes, then flip and cook on the second side.
  6. Proceed in this manner until all the batter is cooked, keeping the first batch warm in a 200 degree oven until ready to serve. Garnish as desired. (I garnished the above pictured pancakes with lightly sweetened coconut butter.)
Recipe Notes

This recipe makes 7-8 medium size pancakes. It can serve 3-4 people if you have side dishes of meat and condiments.  If you want a big plate of pancakes for each person, then this recipe will serve 2. The recipe can be doubled.

Comments 16

  1. I’m loving all of your pancake recipes … haven’t used cricket flour or plantains before, so I appreciate the info.

    1. So glad! After the initial shock, lol, just make sure to look into good farms, not just the stuff off of Amazon. 😉 I have one link in the article and hopefully there will be more in the future as well.

  2. I tried the recipe with coconut flour as I didn’t have any cricket flour (yet) and maple syrup (my oldest is sensitive to honey), but had 2 ripe plantains that needed to get used. The pancakes stuck to the pan (a well seasoned cast iron pan with plenty of ghee), but didn’t hold together very well. I thought perhaps they needed more time to cook, but they burned before firming up. I turned the heat to low and made even smaller pancakes, but still no luck. They were delicious and the kids loved the flavor, but they were big messy globs of overcooked outsides and wet insides. Any advice?

    1. Hi Nilou, thanks for writing! I’ve had that happen with plantains but only if I omit the coconut or cricket flour. With coconut flour, they have always turned out more like a “normal” pancake. Hmmm, I’m not sure. I do make these for my littlest no-egg kiddo a couple times a week. I wish I had more to contribute as far as what might have gone wrong…

      1. That’s why I was so excited to find your pancake recipe – my kids are both allergic to eggs and can’t have any grains right now. Would you increase the coconut flour or the gelatin? I’d love to make this recipe work for us. Our diet is sooooo limited right now. We’re technically not even supposed to have plantains at the moment, but we’re all craving some starch!

        1. Yes, try increasing the coconut flour, but just a little, like adding 2 tablespoons more. You may need to fold it in by hand. I understand. We have been there!! Can you all have winter squash, too? They have been our saving grace for years! Hugs and blessings!! Good luck!! At least they liked the recipe. And yes, lower heat so they don’t burn.

          1. Yes, we can have winter squashes, but in small portions (we’re currently treating my 7 yo’s SIBO, and the whole family is doing the diet, but the kids also have food allergies and sensitivities which limit options even more). My 3yo will eat simple roasted or pureed squash, but my 7yo needs some more variety, hence the search for compliant pancake, quick “bread” and flat “bread” recipes.
            Thanks for your feedback. I’ll try again next time I have ripe plantains 🙂
            PS Made the Raw Strawberry Lemon Cream Pie from your ebook last night with a few modifications. It was a big hit, even for our non-restrictive diet guests. Thanks!

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