Sweetened with just a wink of honey this treat will suit both kids and grown-ups. It's GAPS-friendly. The spices can be modified just a bit for it to be AIP. And since everyone loves pumpkin, it's a treat most people will enjoy.

Winter Squash “Fruit” Leather

Megan Hors d'oeuvres, Condiments & Sides, Treats, Whole Food Recipes 21 Comments

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Those of us on whole food diets always appreciate a grab-and-go snack that’s super healthy, yields energy and isn’t necessarily fruit-based.  This vegetable leather is just the snack.

Winter squash fruit leathers are perfect for little ones, lunches and even for grown-ups. They’re a novelty, yet they’re familiar and delicious.

Sweetened with just a wink of honey this treat is even GAPS-friendly. The spices can be modified just a bit for it to be AIP.  And since everyone loves pumpkin, it’s a treat most people will enjoy.

Those of us on whole food diets always appreciate a grab-and-go snack that's super healthy, yields energy and isn't necessarily fruit-based. This vegetable leather is just the snack. It's a vitamin A party in your pocket!

Quick to whip up, pretty to wrap up and fun to eat up! Winter Squash Fruit Leather!

Winter Squash Fruit Leathers

Winter Squash "Fruit" Leathers
Yum
Print Recipe
If you don't have leftover winter squash, bake a whole kabocha or butternut on a cookie sheet at 375 degrees for an hour and a half, depending on its size, or until a knife slides through the flesh easily. Poke a sharp knife through one side before baking to allow steam to escape.
Servings Prep Time
8 rolls 10 minutes
Passive Time
6-10 hours (baking the squash and dehydrating the leathers included)
Servings Prep Time
8 rolls 10 minutes
Passive Time
6-10 hours (baking the squash and dehydrating the leathers included)
Winter Squash "Fruit" Leathers
Yum
Print Recipe
If you don't have leftover winter squash, bake a whole kabocha or butternut on a cookie sheet at 375 degrees for an hour and a half, depending on its size, or until a knife slides through the flesh easily. Poke a sharp knife through one side before baking to allow steam to escape.
Servings Prep Time
8 rolls 10 minutes
Passive Time
6-10 hours (baking the squash and dehydrating the leathers included)
Servings Prep Time
8 rolls 10 minutes
Passive Time
6-10 hours (baking the squash and dehydrating the leathers included)
Ingredients
Servings: rolls
Instructions
  1. Place the cooked, cooled winter squash into a high-powered blender.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and blend on low speed for 30-50 seconds, until the puree is smooth and the ingredients are evenly combined.
  3. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and pour the puree into the center of the paper.
  4. Use an offset spatula to spread the puree out to 1/4" thickness.
  5. Dehydrate between 95 and 145 degrees for 4-8 hours, depending on your dehydrator. The leather is done when it is tacky but no longer wet at all in the center. The leather should be pliable, not brittle.
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