Rose Petal-Beet Smoothie

Megan Drinks, Treats, Whole Food Recipes 18 Comments

For those who can’t have fruit or those who want more veggies in a glass, here’s a slushy creamy smoothie that’s a health food treat.

Having recently written about the dangers of most green smoothies, one additional point to make is why are greens the only vegetables that gain admittance into smoothies?

You have perhaps already found my fruit-free carrot smoothie?  Yay: non-green veggie smoothie #1!

And here’s non-green, fruit-free veggie smoothie #2!

Beets are full of fiber, great for the bowels. They are also super great for heart health, as well as being high in B-complex vitamins and minerals.  Beets are low in calories, most of which come from carbohydrates, providing a gentle yield of energy.  The fact that they are cooked in this recipe makes them easy on one’s digestion.

Read about rose petals! They are so nutritious, calming and healing, made into tea.

The flavor of this smoothie? Delicious and exciting! If you’re up for an adventure, are open-minded about juice flavors and what constitutes a good smoothie, I think you’ll love this unique combination.

With cultured dairy added, this treat also provides probiotics!

Rose Petal-Beet Smoothie
Yum
Print Recipe
Have you ever cooked beets before? Just wash them, boil them whole until they are fork-tender through to the center, about 45 minutes; then peel them under cool running water by rubbing their skins off. Cube them now into 1" chunks. Spread them out on a parchment lined cookie sheet and freeze them. After about 2 hours they'll be frozen hard and ready for use in this recipe! (You will need two large or 3 medium size beets to yield 2 cups cooked, cubed beets for this recipe.)
Servings Prep Time
2 people 10 minutes
Passive Time
3 hours (cooking and freezing the beets)
Servings Prep Time
2 people 10 minutes
Passive Time
3 hours (cooking and freezing the beets)
Rose Petal-Beet Smoothie
Yum
Print Recipe
Have you ever cooked beets before? Just wash them, boil them whole until they are fork-tender through to the center, about 45 minutes; then peel them under cool running water by rubbing their skins off. Cube them now into 1" chunks. Spread them out on a parchment lined cookie sheet and freeze them. After about 2 hours they'll be frozen hard and ready for use in this recipe! (You will need two large or 3 medium size beets to yield 2 cups cooked, cubed beets for this recipe.)
Servings Prep Time
2 people 10 minutes
Passive Time
3 hours (cooking and freezing the beets)
Servings Prep Time
2 people 10 minutes
Passive Time
3 hours (cooking and freezing the beets)
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Bring the water to a boil and add the rose buds or petals. Turn off the heat, stir the petals so they are all wet and allow them to steep for 15 minutes.
  2. Place the frozen beets into a high-powered blender.
  3. Strain the tea, pressing on the solids, and measure out 1 cup. Add this to the blender.
  4. Add the dairy and your sweetener of choice.
  5. Blend on medium-low speed, stopping and popping any air bubbles by the blade as needed, for about 50 seconds, until the smoothie is totally smooth.
  6. Serve and enjoy!
Share this Recipe
 

 

For those who can't have fruit or those who want more veggies in a glass, this creamy slushy milkshake is a health food treat.

  • When the petal dry, they are a lot smaller. So, does it matter for how much you put in. Also, does it matter if the roses don’t have much scent? Sharing by the way!

  • mmmm this is gorgeous, I love beets!

  • Megan Stevens

    I agree, such a pretty color! So glad! Hope you love the smoothie!

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Anna, the quantity is based on dried petals. The ones I buy are petite whole buds. The main objective is that the tea is very concentrated, a strong brew. If your petals don’t have a strong scent, I would try brewing up what the recipe recommends, 1/4 cup to 1 1/2 cups water, and see how strong the flavor is. If it’s a weak tea, you could double the amount or experiment to see how many of your petals it would take. The idea is for the flavors to be balanced and to really taste the rose and the beets evenly, with a bit of honey flavor too. So glad you’re sharing; thanks!! 🙂

  • I adore your articles!

  • Megan Stevens

    Thank you, Anna!!! <3

  • Ariana Mullins

    Love this idea! I believe we should be eating a lot more flowers!

  • jennifermargulis

    This looks great EXCEPT I’m allergic to beets. Sad face.

  • Emily @ Recipes to Nourish

    This is so beautiful! I bet the flavor is incredible. I love beets + roses.

  • Kylie Worthington

    I love this idea so much – not to mention, it’s gorgeous!

  • Megan Stevens

    Thanks, Kylie!

  • Megan Stevens

    Thanks, Emilie, really fun flavor. 🙂 I often try to picture it as a fruit, its own exotic bright pink tropical fruit, when I’m tasting it.

  • Megan Stevens

    🙁 I know someone else who is too, so inconvenient!

  • Megan Stevens

    Oh, I love that, well said.

  • HolisticHomemaking

    I’ve eaten an edible flower before … interested in giving something like this a try!

  • Megan Stevens

    Yes, so many lovely edible flowers out there!! 🙂

  • Andrea Wyckoff

    Such a beautiful pairing!! I often make “fairy water” with rose petals, and the combo with beets sounds fabulous!

  • Megan Stevens

    Fairy water sounds LOVELY!! <3