Rose bud Hibiscus Tea

ROSEBUD HIBISCUS TEA (depression, constipation, anxiety, immune and more)

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Rosebud Hibiscus Tea tastes awesome, but as with all herbal teas, there’s more: it treats depression, constipation, anxiety, insomnia, diabetes; it provides immune boosting AND a record-high dose of antioxidants. Will it help you feel better? Better is a relative word.  I have definitely felt BETTER on coffee.  It’s a drug-high-happy.  These flowers aren’t going to do that for you; but neither are they going to drain your adrenals.  They are known to provide a gentle but noticeable lift in your mood and an overall feeling of well-being.

Symptoms

Experienced a bad night’s sleep, constipation, depression?  The temptation is to reach for black coffee to make you feel better, or maybe caffeinated tea.  If you are dealing with any gut related health issues, drinking caffeine will simply drain your adrenals; and coffee will wreak havoc on your gut lining.

What you need is a hot, power-drink designed to alleviate your symptoms.

Life sometimes has sweet ironies.  Instead of the intense punch coffee can offer, what about reaching for dried flowers?

It is hard to believe, until we have experienced transformation ourselves from the pure, whole foods in nature, just how powerful plants in their original (or dried), beautiful state can be.

While  most of us think of herbal coffee as being dark and robust, made from herbal roots like chicory and dandelion, that herbal coffee only mimics the flavor of coffee beans, while providing different healing attributes. The flowers featured in this tea still give you a strong flavor and dark color, but their effects are awakening, providing the real outcome coffee drinkers often seek.

Flower Power…

It’s not just something that hippies used to experience!

Let’s look closely at hibiscus and rose buds.

ROSEBUD HIBISCUS TEA (depression, constipation, anxiety, immune and more) #rosebudtea #rosetea #hibiscustea #coffeealternatives #depression #moodbooster

Hibiscus

Hibiscus petals are astringent, citrusy, and fruity, to taste.  Rose buds offer perfumes of Persia and pistachios.  Rose buds are restful.  Hibiscus petals are vibrant and edgy.  Together, they are visually stunning.  To drink, they are calming and yet dramatic.

Nutritionally, hibiscus blossoms are at the very height of all foods for their antioxidant content! Theteatalk.com says of the antioxidants found in hibiscus,

They help to rid our bodies of free radicals (destructive molecules that can damage our cells and DNA) and protect us against chronic disease, such as heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and cancer.

They are also valued for high levels of vitamin C, balancing blood pressure levels and for fighting inflammation.  Many cultures help treat diabetes and insomnia with hibiscus.  Tea from the flowers is broadly enjoyed internationally, and often medicinally.

Rosebuds

Rose bud blossoms are also enjoyed globally and medicinally and rank high for their antioxidant levels.  Rose petals help to heal and stimulate the digestive tract.  They can improve symptoms of constipation, insomnia and depression.  Emotionally, rose is known to be soothing.  For women’s health, rose has a reputation for balancing hormones and hormone-related symptoms.  And a very small amount of caffeine is found in rose petals which gently stimulates the central nervous system.

Find hibiscus flowers here.

Find rose petals here.

Rose Bud Hibiscus Tea
Prep Time
5 mins
Total Time
15 mins
 
Servings: 2 servings
Author: Megan
Ingredients
  • 4 cups filtered water
  • 2 T. rose buds or petals
  • 1 T. hibiscus petals
Instructions
  1. In a small saucepan combine the 3 ingredients.
  2. Bring the water to a simmer and turn off the heat, stirring briefly to saturate the buds.
  3. Allow the tea to steep for 10 minutes.
  4. Strain it, as the hibiscus blossoms can be bitter if steeped too long.
  5. Sweeten and serve hot.
Recipe Notes

In warm weather, or as a thirst quencher, this also makes a great iced tea.

 

Experienced a bad night's sleep, constipation, depression? The temptation is to reach for black coffee to make us feel better, or maybe caffeinated tea. If you are dealing with any gut related health issues, drinking caffeine will simply drain your adrenals; and coffee will wreak havoc on your gut lining. What you need is a hot, power-drink designed to alleviate your symptoms. Life sometimes has sweet ironies. Instead of the intense punch coffee can offer, what about reaching for dried flowers? It is hard to believe, until we have experienced transformation ourselves from pure, whole foods in nature, just how powerful plants in their original (or dried), beautiful state can be.

Love flower power tea?  See what the lovely stamens of the crocus flower can do: Find Creamy SAFFRON Tea here.

Comments 16

  1. I was raised on rose hip tea as the first drink in the morning and now when I crave that taste, I have the hibiscus tea in the morning (rose hip berries don’t seem to taste the same as in my grandmothers kitchen). Such a nice idea to add rose buds, what a magical morning drink!

    1. Thank you, Kylie! Yes, the hibiscus especially has a strong, astringent, fruity smell. The rose is soft, perfume-y and mellow.

  2. This is one of my favorite combos!! I’m literally sipping on rose hip, rose petal, hawrhorne berry & hibiscus “jun” tea right now. It’s like a botanical fruit punch. ❤️🌺

    Always love visiting your blog!!

    PS: made your divine chamomile muffins again this weekend, cheers to flower power!!

  3. Sounds amazing. I have some dried rose petals leftover and hibiscus calyx leftover from last summer harvest. I will have to try this. I like Andrea’s idea too of combining the rose hips and hawthorne.

  4. So pretty too! You just know that this is one of my favourites! I make like this or with addition of RoseHips and/or Hawthorn berries/flowers. Important to note that a therapeutic dose is needed to create an ‘herbal action’. In this case, we would want to drink 3-4 cups of tea for several days to nourish a change in the body. Yum!

    1. I had those first too, Linda. I like the dried, steeped flowers better, because rose water is more perfume-y in flavor.

  5. Making homemade tea is so simple and has so many benefits! This looks amazing, I didn’t realize all the perks that came with the combo.

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