bowl of fermented brussels sprouts with ginger and garlic

Fermented Brussels Sprouts with Garlic & Ginger {Traditional, Paleo, GAPS, AIP, Keto, Whole30}

Megan Hors d'oeuvres, Condiments & Sides, I may receive a commission if you purchase through links in this post, Traditional Healing Foods, Whole Food Recipes 25 Comments

When your teenagers are barking across the table, “Save some for me; save some for me!” And your hubby is saying, “This is a good one, Meg.” And you’re sneaking into the fridge to drink the brine…

…And your kids are daring each other to eat the big ginger slices, and loving the spicy sting that comes from that vivacious healing root!

This is a great time of year to make an exciting ferment. You’ll love the results: the texture of the little “cabbages,” the fresh crazy-good flavor of the brine, and as always, the fun of the process!

Other than the fact that this ferment is simply delicious, it works great for immune boosting. If you happen to be fighting an illness in the home, you have a bouquet of fermented garlic and ginger slices to grab– to give your body aid toward wellness!

Fermented Brussels Sprouts with Garlic and Ginger #fermentedveggies #fermentedbrusselssprouts #brusselssproutspickles #easypickles

Fermented Brussels Sprouts with Garlic & Ginger

Fermented Brussels Sprouts with Garlic & Ginger
Yum
Print Recipe
Servings
10 cups
Servings
10 cups
Fermented Brussels Sprouts with Garlic & Ginger
Yum
Print Recipe
Servings
10 cups
Servings
10 cups
Ingredients
Servings: cups
Instructions
  1. In large dish with pour spout whisk together water and sea salt, stir to dissolve. Set aside.
  2. Place Brussels sprouts, garlic and ginger into preferred fermenting container(s). (See fermenting container options below in Recipe Notes.) Pack pieces in tightly (to the neck if using canning jars).
  3. Pour salted water over Brussels sprouts. Press firmly on solids, so water rises above and air bubbles are released. You want the brine to come about 1/2-1 inch above the vegetable pieces but still leave 1 inch head space if using jars.
  4. Weight with fermenting weights (see link below in Recipe notes) or preferred weight.
  5. Lightly seal lid(s), and place in warmest location possible for 7-14 days, depending on warmth of location. Check the veggies every 2 days or so to make sure they're staying below the brine.
  6. They're done when the liquid is no longer very bubbly, when the Brussels sprouts are nicely tart/vinegary, to your taste.
  7. Transfer to refrigerator, and serve as a condiment. The flavor will continue to improve and develop. Any extra brine you don't wish to drink can be used to ferment in other recipes. (See my Sourdough Grain-free Waffle recipe. The brine is used to reduce phytates in cassava flour. It's great to have extra brine on hand!)
Recipe Notes

This is my favorite fermentation crock.

These are my favorite fermentation weights, if you're going to ferment in mason jars.

Share this Recipe
 

 

Enjoy!