How to Make Yellow Dock Tea for Anemia

How to Make Yellow Dock Tea: Iron Wine~ For Anemia

Megan Drinks, Essential Oils & Supplements, Health & Nutrition, Traditional Healing Foods, Whole Food Recipes 29 Comments

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Recently diagnosed with anemia, my super-doc put me on 3 cups of yellow dock root tea a day.

I like the side benefits of yellow dock: it aids those with low stomach acid (me!), heals the liver and improves digestion. It can also be used topically to help with acne and psoriasis and is excellent for arthritis and issues of inflammation.

The tea is STRONG, like what black coffee must taste like to a young child, bitter and dry. Getting the right ratio of root to water takes some figuring.

Sweetened it becomes palatable.

I’d like to share my recipe and teach you how to make a decoction: healing tea from a woodsy root.

Recently diagnosed with anemia, my super-doc put me on 3 cups of yellow dock root tea a day. I was impressed with his knowing of an iron-rich food source that I hadn't heard of or utilized in the past. I like the side benefits of yellow dock: it aids those with low stomach acid (me!) and improves digestion.

YELLOW DOCK TEA RECIPE

Yellow Dock Tea
Yum
Print Recipe
Yellow dock is synergistic with several other herbs, including burdock root. I like to add ground burdock, when I have it on hand, for a more delicious brew. The vanilla extract is added to the decoction because the alcohol in it helps pull the healing properties from the yellow dock root. The vanilla flavor makes the drink more palatable.
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
15 minutes 1 hour
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
15 minutes 1 hour
Yellow Dock Tea
Yum
Print Recipe
Yellow dock is synergistic with several other herbs, including burdock root. I like to add ground burdock, when I have it on hand, for a more delicious brew. The vanilla extract is added to the decoction because the alcohol in it helps pull the healing properties from the yellow dock root. The vanilla flavor makes the drink more palatable.
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
15 minutes 1 hour
Servings Prep Time
4 servings 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
15 minutes 1 hour
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Boil water, yellow dock and vanilla for 15 minutes.
  2. Turn off the heat, stir in burdock and cover.
  3. Allow the brew to steep for 30-60 minutes.
  4. Add 2 cups water and reheat to serve.
  5. Pour through a strainer. Sweeten to taste with honey or stevia.
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VARIATIONS

Yellow dock goes by many names, including Garden Patience and Sheep Sorrel. If you prefer an alternative to tea here’s how to make a tincture from it.

I have also learned to add hibiscus. High in Vitamin C, hibiscus adds a lovely, rich, fruity note and helps the iron to assimilate. To this recipe, add 2 T. of loose hibiscus petals during the last 10 minutes of steeping.

One cautionary word- yellow dock is moderately high in oxalates. Some sources warn it should not be consumed long term.

I am not a doctor, nor do I pretend to be one. Please consult your healthcare practitioner before beginning any new herb or healing protocol.

You can buy yellow dock root and hibiscus here.

  • Raine Irving Saunders

    This recipe looks beautiful and amazing Megan! I really want to try this. When life slows down a bit, I am definitely putting it on my list for a to-do!! 🙂

  • Emily @ Recipes to Nourish

    This is great! I need to focus on boosting my iron intake. I feel this will really help my health. Have this pinned.

  • Jessica from SimplyHealthyHome

    Yellow dock is so wonderful for iron boosting Great post.

  • linda spiker

    As usual I have learned something from your blog! I have never heard of yellow dock before. Good to know!

  • Renee Kohley

    this sounds pretty strong knowing those herbs! ha! but this is so good to know if i ever need it – do you know if this is ok during pregnancy? i was always anemic during preganancy – would be good to know if i can recommend it to pregnant friends.

  • naturalfitfoodie

    Anemic.. check, low stomach acid ..check .. Two reasons I need to make this tea. Thank you so much for sharing Megan!

  • Megan Stevens

    So glad! You’re welcome!

  • Megan Stevens

    Yes, it is safe during pregnancy and nursing, great question! 🙂

  • Megan Stevens

    So glad. Thanks, Linda.

  • Megan Stevens

    Thanks, Jessica.

  • Megan Stevens

    So glad, Emily! Blessings.

  • Megan Stevens

    Wonderful. 🙂

  • Chloe

    I’ve never heard of this before. Thanks for sharing!

  • Gosh, seems like quite the healing concoction. 🙂

  • Megan Stevens

    Yes, strong in every way! 🙂

  • Megan Stevens

    Thanks, Chloe.

  • Shelley Brogly

    Special Precautions & Warnings:
    Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Taking yellow dock by mouth is LIKELY UNSAFE in women who are pregnant or breast-feeding. It has laxative effects, which are not desirable during pregnancy. Also, the chemicals that cause the laxative effects can be transferred to a nursing infant through breast milk. ???

  • Megan Stevens

    Better to be safe, for sure! Thanks Shelley for addressing this issue. Another great source of iron is grass-fed liver pills, during pregnancy and nursing.

  • Rachel B

    So… where does one find yellow dock root? I’ve never heard of it before by any name. 🙂

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Rachel, you can get it in bulk from natural food stores that have large bulk herb and tea sections. If that isn’t an option in your city you can click on the links above to Mountain Rose Herbs. I just added them, which I should have done sooner. 😉 Thanks for the kick in the pants! One link is at the very top of the article and one link is at the very bottom. Cheers!

  • Jenn

    I couldn’t find it loose so I bought the ingredients in extract form. Any suggestions for ratios to make tea?

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Jenn, sometimes tinctures have a recommendation on the side of the bottle. Does yours? Often it’s 30-40 drops thrice daily. But no, I’m sorry, I don’t have any experience with that form myself. Best wishes.

  • Yada

    Yellowdock good for so many other things as well. I will try this recipe as I have some powder left. I also have goldenseal and will have to see what I can do with it. I think you can make tea with it as well. Google is my friend. We shall see. lol

  • Natalie

    Thank you for this!!

  • Stuart

    I am interested in your discussion of herbs to deal with psoriasis. I am on prescribed steroids and anti-fungal creams (my dermatologist believes that some of the skin eruptions are fungal in nature) for more than 5 years. Your information and recommendations for yellow dock root and burdock seem to be worth a try but here is my problem: I have a “short gut” having had half of my small intestine removed as the result of a benign tumor. It left me unable to process all forms of dairy and soy. In addition I need to regularly consume binding foods (bananas, rice, dry toast) as a result of the surgery. I don’t want to address the psoriasis problem and cause an increase in bowel problems. What do you advise?

  • Megan Stevens

    Hi Stuart, I’m not a practitioner, so I can’t advise you. I recommend you find a great recommendation for a functional doctor. I do not believe that steroids or anti-fungals are safe for long-term use. But functional doctors are medically trained with a mind toward healing and wellness by natural means. Blessings and best of luck!

  • Stuart

    Thanks for the advice. I live near Concord, NH and about 1.5 hours from Boston. How might I go about finding a functional doctor. Any recommendations that you might have would be appreciated.

  • Megan Stevens
  • Hung Chau

    I wonder how often we can drink Yellow Dock Root tea? Anyone knows? Please help.